Q:   

How do I get a temporary restraining order?

 Contact the Clerk of Courts for the county that you live in.


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Q:   

When do you have to report an accident?

 Immediately. Any accident must be reported when it results in:

·        Injury or death of a person

·        $1,000 or more total damage to property owned by any one person

·        Damages of $200 or more to government property (except motor vehicles)

Call the police immediately. They will report it for you. If they cannot file the report, you will need to.

To file an accident report, complete a Wisconsin Driver Report of Accident form MV4002 and mail it to:

Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT)

Traffic Accident Section

P.O. Box 7919

Madison, WI 53707-7919


An accident entry will be put on the record of each driver shown on the accident report. Accident entries remain on the driver record for 4 years from the date of the accident.

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Q:   

After I buy a vehicle, how many days do I have to register it in my name?

 Wisconsin law requires buyers of cars and small trucks (8000 pounds or less) to display a permanent or temporary plate within two business days of purchase. See Temporary license plates.


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Q:   

Do I have to have a front license plate?

 Yes, for passenger cars and light trucks.


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Q:   

Do you have to wear a seat belt in the back seat of a vehicle?

 Yes, if the vehicle is equipped with a three point (shoulder harness) system, or if the passenger is under eight-years of age. Under age four must have a child safety seat. No child under the age of 16 can ride in the open cargo area of light trucks without a safety belt or restraint.


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Q:   

How can I get a copy of a crash report? Contact the Oneida Police Department during normal business hours at 869-2239 if the Oneida Police Department investigated the crash.

 Contact the Oneida Police Department during normal business hours at 869-2239 if the Oneida Police Department investigated the crash.


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Q:   

How do I get a replacement title?

 Replacement Titles Application
If your Wisconsin certificate of title has been lost, destroyed, or stolen, you may obtain a replacement by filing an application for title - registration form MV1 (150 KB) or MV5 (234 KB).
What is needed
The application must contain the vehicle identification number, the owner's name and address, and the signature of the registered owner. The vehicle identification number can be found on your registration card, or on the vehicle itself. Only the owner shown in Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV) records may apply for a replacement title.
Permission to pick up title is required
DMV now requires anyone picking up a replacement title for a vehicle they do not own, to present a completed "Permission to Pick Up Title" form MV2932 (79 KB), and show proof of identity in the form of a valid driver license or identification card. If the requestor does not have written permission or proper identification, WisDOT will mail the title to the vehicle owner.
A replacement title voids all previous titles.


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Q:   

I lost my title and now I want to sell my vehicle. How do I go about it?

 You must make application for a duplicate title. See Replacement titles. You cannot sell a vehicle without a title.


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Q:   

I lost my Wisconsin renewal notice? What do I do?

 I lost my Wisconsin renewal notice? What do I do?  License plate renewal notices are mailed to the last known address of the vehicle's registered owner about 30 days before the registration expires. If you have lost your notice, or


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Q:   

I've recently moved. How do I notify DMV of my address change?

 You can call (608)266-2353, 24 hours a day to change your address on your driver license. See Change of address for information on change of address for your registration/license plates.


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Q:   

If l buy a car in Wisconsin and want to register it in another state, how do I get it home? If l buy a car in Wisconsin and want to register it in another state, how do I get it home?

 Temporary registration is available.


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Q:   

May you put your vehicle license plates in areas other than the designated area?

 If two plates are issued, one should be in the front and one in the back. Attach firmly and rigidly in a horizontal position and a conspicuous place. Must be displayed so it can be readily read. Rear plate must have a lamp illuminating the plate 50 feet to the rear. Re: Wisconsin statute 347.15


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Q:   

What accident entries are on your driver record?What accident entries are on your driver record?

 Regardless of fault, accidents appear on the driver record of all drivers involved in a reportable accident.
An accident is reportable if there was $1000 or more damage to any one person’s property, anyone was injured or there was $200 or more in damage to government property, other than vehicles.
The driver record only shows involvement in an accident on a specific date, the severity and the county of occurrence. It does not show who was at fault.
Insurance companies secure information from your driver record and other sources to determine if any claims have been paid out under your policy.
You can obtain an official copy of your driver record. There is a $5 fee for each record requested.
If the information on your driver record does not agree with the information that your insurance company has, you will need to contact your insurance company for further information and clarification.


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Q:   

What if someone reports a minor accident that happened a day or two ago?

 He or she may complete a voluntary report and send it to Madison on their own.


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Q:   

What is temporary registration?

 Wisconsin law requires buyers of cars and small trucks (8000 pounds or less) to display a permanent or temporary plate within two business days of purchase.
·        The Wisconsin dealer or financial institution involved in the sale provides temporary plates free to Wisconsin residents .
·        Temporary plates are available from DMV temporary license plate agents for a cost of $3, a $5 service fee and the application fees.
·        Permanent or temporary plates are available at DMV service centers offering registration services for a $5 service fee and the application fees.
·        Temporary plates issued to Wisconsin residents are valid for 90 days.
·        If you have a plate to transfer, put it on the new vehicle, complete an MV5 (234 KB) or MV1 (150 KB) form, send it with the title and application fees to DMV and keep a copy in your vehicle.
·        Out of state residents purchasing a vehicle in Wisconsin may obtain a temporary plate valid for 30 days for a fee of $3 plus any application and service fees.
·        Driving without plates is subject to a maximum fine of $200.
·        Handmade ‘LAF' (license applied for) plates are not acceptable.


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Q:   

What is the law and fine for wearing seatbelts?

 Ten ($10) dollars for driver and adult passengers. Adult includes everyone from age eight and older. A citation for anyone under age 16 is given to the driver of the vehicle.
Seat belt law
Any automobile sold in the state of Wisconsin must be equipped with safety belts.
All drivers of motor vehicles and all passengers over the age of four must wear safety belts.
These laws apply to Wisconsin residents and non-residents alike in all front seat positions and in rear seat positions with three-point belts. Children under four are required to be restrained in an appropriate child safety restraint (see Child safety seats).
Currently, Wisconsin has what is known as a secondary enforcement seat belt law. It allows law enforcement to ticket a driver for not belting up only after the person has already been stopped for some other violation.
A standard, or primary enforcement seat belt law would allow police to stop and ticket a driver for not wearing a seat belt, just like any other routine traffic violation.
Where a primary enforcement law exists, seat belt usage is higher. States such as California and North Carolina have realized a significant increase in safety belt usage (to 80 % in North Carolina) through the combination of a primary law and an aggressive awareness and enforcement effort.
Wisconsin law provides for a fine of $10 and no points are assigned against a person's driver record. Those subject to the penalty include drivers, drivers with unrestrained passengers 4 to 16 years old and passengers at least 16 years old.
The penalty for violating the child passenger law involving a child under the age of 4 is not less than $30 or more than $75. The penalty for violating the child passenger law involving a child between the ages of 4-8 is not less than $10 or more than $25.


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Q:   

What types of vehicles don't need front license plates in Wisconsin?

 Municipal, state, apportioned vehicles and base plate tractors


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Q:   

When I buy a vehicle from another state, how do I register it in Wisconsin? May I drive it home? When I buy a vehicle from another state, how do I register it in Wisconsin? May I drive it home?

 You should be able to get an in-transit plate or temporary permit, then register the vehicle when you return to Wisconsin.


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Q:   

Who has access to accident data? Who has access to accident data?

 ·        WisDOT for analysis of highway safety
·        DMV for administration of the safety responsibility law
·        Law enforcement agencies for selective enforcement
·        Traffic safety commissions and traffic engineers for safety and elimination of hazards
·        Driver educators, legislators, insurance companies and other interested parties
·        County highway safety commissions to meet their duties under S. 83.013, Wis. Statutes
·        Local units of government to target specific accident locations


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Q:   

Who has to wear a safety belt?

 Only applies to all front designate seating spaces, and to those other designated seating spaces where there is a three point (shoulder harness) system. Two point (lap belt) systems in rear are voluntary, except for children under the age of eight.


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Q:   

Am I entitled to pre-trial discovery for a traffic citation?

 Generally, neither party is entitled to pretrial discovery in traffic forfeiture actions. But a defendant has a limited right to inspect and test devices used by the state to determine whether a traffic violation has been committed, including speed and alcohol detection devices. Before these devices can be inspected and tested, a defendant must first request court approval within 10 days after the alleged violation, and a court must order that these devices be inspected and tested. See Wisconsin statute 345.421.


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Q:   

Are radar detectors legal?

 They are unlawful for commercial motor vehicles. Otherwise, they are only unlawful if they constitute a view obstruction


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Q:   

Do I have to register my handgun in Wisconsin?

  
Q:   

Do I have to wear a helmet while operating a motorcycle? Moped?

 Anyone who drives a motorcycle must have a Class M motorcycle license or motorcycle instruction permit.
Moped drivers do not have the same licensing requirements. They must have a Class D regular, probationary, or special license restricted to moped use.
A person must hold a Wisconsin motorcycle instruction permit or surrender a valid motorcycle license from another state before they may obtain a Class M license.
Instruction permit
To obtain a motorcycle instruction permit, the applicant must pass the motorcycle knowledge test, a sign test and a vision screening.
If under age 18, the following are also required:
·        Be at least 16 years old
·        Have a sponsor
·        Provide proof of Driver Ed completion
·        Provide proof of enrollment or completion of a Basic Motorcycle Rider Course
Some restrictions apply during the period the instruction permit is held:
·        Must wear eye protection
·        Must wear an approved helmet
·        Permit holders may ride alone during the day.
·        If cycling after dark, the permit holder must be accompanied by a person at least 25 years old with two years licensed driving experience and a Class M motorcycle license.
Skills test
The applicant must demonstrate competency in motorcycle operation by passing a Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT) administered motorcycle driving skills test or providing a waiver showing completion of WisDOT approved Basic Motorcycle Rider Course.
For the WisDOT driving skills test, the applicant must provide a cycle in good working order and wear eye protection and an approved helmet.
Skills tests are conducted by appointment at DMV service centers located throughout the state.
Motorcycle violations
Successful completion of either the Basic Rider Course, or the Advanced Rider Course can also be used to reduce your driving record demerit points for motorcycle violations by up to 3 points, which you have been convicted of during the prior 12 months. A person is limited to only one point reduction every five years.
Courses are provided throughout Wisconsin and through the riding season by training sponsors in various locations.
Motorcycle Skills Test Waiver Program
Upon successful completion of a Basic Motorcycle Rider Course, the motorcycle riding instructor issues each student a signed waiver authorization form. This form is usable only one time and only by the person to whom it is issued. When other licensing requirements have been met and the waiver form is presented at the DMV service center, a Class M endorsement will be added to the person's driver license.


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Q:   

Do you have to have insurance on your car to operate in Wisconsin?

Yes.  

Liability insurance

Minimum liability coverage amounts are:

  • $10,000 for property damage
  • $25,000 for the injury or death of one person
  • $50,000 for the injury or death of more than one person

Proof of insurance

Drivers and owners of motor vehicles are required to show proof of insurance at traffic stops/accidents if requested by law enforcement. Proof is not necessary for trailers or semi-trailers.

  • Operating a motor vehicle without insurance may result in a fine of up to $500.
  • Drivers and owners who fail to show proof of insurance at the time of the stop/accident may be fined up to $10.
  • Offering proof of insurance that is found to be fraudulent may result in a fine of up to $5,000.

There is no requirement that you provide proof of insurance when you obtain your driver license or are registering a vehicle, unless that information is requested by DMV and is a requirement before reinstatement of a driver license after a suspension or revocation.

If you have additional questions about the minimum amounts required, please contact your insurance agent or the Office of the Commissioner of Insurance.

Questions about the content of this page:
Bureau of Driver Services, Uninsured Motorists Unit
Last modified: August 6, 2012
BDS/QIS/UMU

All external hyperlinks are provided for your information and for the benefit of the general public. The Wisconsin Department of Transportation does not testify to, sponsor or endorse the accuracy of the information provided on externally linked pages. Some pages contain links to other documents and media types (PDF, Word, Flash, Video, etc.) and require free plugins to work. Visit our software information page for assistance.


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Q:   

Do you need a driver license to operate a maintenance vehicle on the roadway?

Yes, unless it is an implement of husbandry.

 


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Q:   

Does a traffic warning end up on my driving record?

 Does a traffic warning end up on my driving record? No. However, warnings records are maintained by the Oneida Police Department. If you are issued two warnings in one year for the same violation, a citation will be issued for


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Q:   

Equipment: I am replacing my rear bumper. What must I follow?

 Cars must have a rear bumper attached the same way it came from the manufacturer. Pick-up trucks do not need a rear bumper.
What is the height requirement for vehicle bumpers?
For cars, the requirement is two-inches plus or minus manufacturers specifications.
Pickup trucks may have up to four-inches plus for tires, and five-inches plus for suspension for a combination of an additional nine-inches over manufacturers specifications.


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Q:   

How can I reopen a ticket? How would this help me?

 Specific questions about if a case can be reopened should be addressed to the convicting court.
If a case is reopened and the final determination of the court results in an accumulation of less than 12 points in any 12-month period, there would be no suspension for demerit points. If a person is already suspended for demerit points, and the court's determination reduces the point accumulation to less than 12 points in any 12-month period; the suspension would be released.


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Q:   

How do I get a copy of my own driving record?

 Your motor vehicle driving abstract (commonly called a driving record) contains your driving history for a specific period of time. Most entries remain on your record for 5 years, except for serious offenses or alcohol related convictions, which remain on your record for 55 years.

The Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV) does not have a public counter where driving records can be obtained. You can request a copy of your own driver record over the phone or by mail.

To order by phone, call (608)261-2566. The automated system, available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, will prompt you to enter your social security number or Wisconsin Driver license number. It is very important that you listen to the complete message and follow the instructions given, or the transaction will not be completed and your request will not go through.

A bill for $5 and your driver record abstract will be mailed to the address on your driving record the next workday. You will also receive a sheet explaining the charge and points entries on your record.

To request your driving record by mail, complete a Vehicle/Driver Record Information Request Form MV2896 (63 KB) and mail it with $5 to:

Wisconsin Department of Transportation
P.O. Box 7995
Madison, WI 53707-7995

To find out the current status of your driver license and the number of points assessed against your driving record, you can call (608)264-7133, for a recorded message, 24 hours a day.
If you have questions about specific convictions:
·        E-mail: rlis.dmv@dot.state.wi.us
·        Call: (608)266-2353


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Q:   

How do I reinstate if my license is revoked or suspended? How do I reinstate if my license is revoked or suspended?

 The difference between a revocation and a suspension
A revocation or suspension have basically the same affect on the privilege to drive in Wisconsin. The real differences between the two are the penalties for being convicted of driving while suspended or revoked and the requirements for reinstatement. Driving after revocation is a criminal offense and can include jail time. Driving while suspended is a civil offense that does not include jail time.
To reinstate a suspended Wisconsin driving privilege, filing proof of insurance is not required except for suspensions under the safety responsibility and damage judgment laws.
To reinstate a revoked Wisconsin driving privilege, a person must file proof of insurance (SR22 form) in all cases, except for the first offense of operating while intoxicated and for all noncompliance (interview/arrest/driver safety plan) revocations.
To find out if you are required to file proof of insurance, how long you are required to file, and whether or not we have acceptable insurance on file, call (608)261-2564 between 6AM and 12 midnight, seven days a week. At the prompt, you will need to enter your social security number and full date of birth.

How to reinstate after suspension (Wisconsin residents)
If you have a Wisconsin driver license in your possession, mail a $50 check or money order payable to Registration Fee Trust to the address below. Be sure to include your full name, date of birth, Wisconsin driver license number, social security number, and your current address.
Wisconsin Department of Transportation
Compliance and Restoration Section
4802 Sheboygan Avenue, Room 301
PO Box 7983
Madison, WI 53707-7983
If your operating privilege was suspended under the safety responsibility or damage judgment laws after April 9, 2001 you will also need to file proof of insurance (SR22 form) with the Department. Contact an insurance company licensed to do business in Wisconsin for the insurance form. Motor carrier insurance may be furnished for commercial motor vehicle operation.
After the suspension period is over, you can confirm that your $50 has been received and your Wisconsin driving privilege is valid by calling (608)264-7133 between 6 a.m. and midnight. You will need your social security number and date of birth to access this information.
If you do not have your Wisconsin license, or it has expired, you will need to:
·        Go to any Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV) service center, except express offices, to apply for a duplicate or renewal.
·        Plan to arrive at least 90 minutes before the center is scheduled to close. Avoid Monday and Friday as they are the busiest days.
·        Show one form of identification with your photo and signature.
·        Pay the $50 reinstatement fee plus a duplicate or renewal fee.
·        File a SR22 if required.
·        Bring a parent or legal guardian to sign as a sponsor for your license if you are under 18.
·        If your operating privilege is under revocation or suspension in any other state, you must satisfy the other state's reinstatement requirements before Wisconsin will issue a license.

How to reinstate after revocation (Wisconsin residents)
If your operating privilege has been revoked you will need to:
·        File proof of insurance (SR22) form) with the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT). Contact an insurance company licensed to do business in Wisconsin for the insurance form. Motor carrier insurance may be furnished for commercial motor vehicle operation. You do not need to file proof of insurance if your operating privilege was revoked for a first offense operating while intoxicated (OWI), for noncompliance with an alcohol assessment, interview or driver safety plan, or because you were arrested for OWI while involved in driver safety plan.
·        Go to any DMV service center, except express offices, and complete an application. Show one form of identification with your photo and signature.
·        Bring a parent or legal guardian to sign as a sponsor for your license if you are under 18.
·        If you are obtaining your first Wisconsin driver license you will need to bring a certified birth certificate.
·        Pass required examinations. A road test fee may be required.
·        Pay a $50 reinstatement fee.
·        If your operating privilege is under revocation or suspension in any other state, you must satisfy the other state's reinstatement requirements before Wisconsin will issue a license.

How to reinstate after suspension or revocation (out-of-state residents)
If you are an out-of-state resident you are required to pay a $50 reinstatement fee. Make checks payable to Registration Fee Trust and mail to the address below. Be sure to include your full name, date of birth, social security number, and your current address.
Wisconsin Department of Transportation
Compliance and Restoration Section
4802 Sheboygan Avenue, Room 301
PO Box 7983
Madison, WI 53707-7983
After the suspension or revocation period is over, you can confirm that your $50 has been received and your Wisconsin driving privilege is valid by calling (608)264-7133 between 6 a.m. and midnight. You will need your social security number and date of birth to access this information.


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Q:   

How do points count on a Graduated Driver License?

 Graduated driver license (GDL) points and convictions
GDL point assessment changes
Point assessments for convictions on or after September 1, 2000 have changed. These changes apply to persons driving on an instruction permit or probationary license and persons who have never held a license, regardless of age or issuance date.
Old law
·        Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT) assessed 2 additional demerit points for convictions on 2nd and subsequent pointable offenses
·        Accumulation of 12 or more points within 12 months resulted in suspension or revocation from 2 months to 1 year, depending on total point accumulation
New law
·        WisDOT assesses double demerit points for convictions on 2nd and subsequent moving violations, except equipment violations under Wisconsin Statute 347
·        Accumulation of 12 to 30 points within 12 months results in suspension for 6 months. If total point accumulation is more than 30 points within 12 months, suspension is for one year
General GDL provisions
Most other GDL provisions apply to all drivers under age 18 that obtain an original driver license on or after September 2000. New drivers, under age 18, have always had to complete driver education, pass the driving skills test and provide sponsorship. GDL requires the driver to meet the following additional criteria. The driver must:
·        Be conviction free for 6 months prior to GDL issuance
·        Hold the instruction permit for at least 6 months
·        Certify 30 hours of behind the wheel experience
A license will be canceled if the Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV) receives a conviction for a violation for a driver under age 18 (who obtained a GDL) and was not 6 months violation free at the time of the GDL issuance. The driver must be 6 months violation free to reapply for the license.
The GDL Violations Prohibiting Issuance of Original Probationary License (278 KB) chart defines those violations/convictions which will prevent license issuance or extend the hours and passenger restriction period for a driver under 18 years of age.


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Q:   

How does the driver license point system work?

 Driver license points - frequently asked questions
My citation says four points; your letter says eight. Why?
The point value noted on the citation is an "estimated point value". The violation for which you are finally convicted and the license type you hold at the time of conviction determine the points assessed against the driving record.
If you hold a probationary license, instruction permit, or no license when the conviction is entered on the record, points will be doubled for any second and subsequent convictions, except for convictions under Chapter 347 of the Wisconsin Statutes, which are primarily vehicle equipment violations.
How many points do I have left?
If you accumulate 12 or more demerit points in any 12-month period, a suspension will result. Individuals with a clear driving record have 0 points. Points are assessed for moving traffic convictions based on the violation offense date. When determining points, be sure to include any pending citations or convictions which do not yet appear on your record.
I have tickets pending. How will this affect my driving record?
The violation date (not conviction date) determines whether you have accumulated 12 or more points in any 12-month period. If you are convicted of any pending violations the points will be counted based on the date of violation. If your conviction(s) result in the accumulation of 12 or more demerit points for violations within any 12-month period, a suspension will result.
Can I hold a ticket open so there will be more than one year between convictions?
Since the determination of your point total is based on violation date and not conviction date, there is no advantage in doing so.
Points are no longer counted against me after one year, but if there is a pending ticket, will the violation date be used?
As long as convictions remain on the driver record, the points for those convictions remain available to determine whether 12 or more points have accumulated in any 12-month period. The violation dates, not the conviction dates, are used in that determination.
For example: you receive a traffic citation and do not go to court for two years. When the court does report the conviction, points are counted from the date of the violation. If the conviction causes you to accumulate 12 points in any 12-month period, your operating privilege will be suspended.

Is there a way to reduce my points?
If you have completed an approved Traffic Safety course, you can request a 3-point reduction of your demerit point total. The point reduction must be claimed before the accumulation of 12 or more points in any 12-month period. No point reduction is permitted if you have already accumulated 12 or more points, which resulted in a suspension of your driving privilege. You can also request a 3-point reduction upon completion of a motorcycle rider course. (This point reduction only applies to violations and convictions incurred while operating a motorcycle.)
Courses can be taken as often as you wish, however you can receive only one point reduction every 5 years.
Can I take a traffic safety course after I'm suspended for accumulating 12 or more points?
Yes, but no point reduction would be permitted and the suspension would stand. A reduction of up to 3 points would be applied after reinstatement of the operating privilege if points exist.
Is a zero point total good or bad?
It helps to remember that these are demerit points. Therefore, you do not want to have points. All drivers with a clear record have zero points. As you accumulate convictions, you accumulate demerit points. If you accumulate 12 or more demerit points in any 12-month period, your driving privilege will be suspended.


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Q:   

How does tire size affect speed?

 One tire size may increase speed 5%.


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Q:   

How does Wisconsin's point system work?

 Demerit points are assessed to drivers when convicted of a moving violation, beginning on the date of the violation.
The courts send the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT) Division of Motor Vehicles records of all convictions for moving traffic violations.
Persons who hold a probationary license are assessed double points for the second and all subsequent points.
When 12 or more demerit points are accumulated in one year, a suspension of the driver privilege is required, for a minimum of two months.
Convictions remain on the driver records for five years from the date of conviction. However, alcohol related and some commercial violations remain on the record for 10 years to life.
Reducing points
The point total may be reduced by three points for attending an approved traffic safety course.
Only one reduction is allowed in a five year period for points assessed to the A, B, C, D classification.
One reduction of three points is also allowed in a five year period for points assessed for class M (Motorcycle) violations.
No point reduction is permitted if in one year a person accumulates 12 or more points which would require suspension.
Points assessed for convictions
Convictions and the points assessed include, but are not limited to the following:
Regular convictions        Points
Attempting to elude an officer        6
Failure to perform duty after accident        6
Operating while revoked or suspended        6
Operating under the influence of intoxicant or drugs        6
Reckless driving or racing        6
Speeding 20 mph or more over limit        6
Violation of occupational license        6
Deviating from traffic lane        4
Driving on wrong side of highway or street        4
Failure to yield right of way        4
Failure to yield to emergency vehicle        4
Imprudent driving, too fast for conditions, failure to have vehicle under control        4
Inattentive driving        4
Failure by operator to stop for school bus when red lights are flashing        4
Speeding 11 through 19 mph over limit        4
Unnecessary acceleration        4
Arterial or traffic control violation        3
Driving wrong way on one way street        3
Failure to dim lights        3
Failure to give proper signal        3
Following too closely        3
Illegal passing        3
Improper brakes or lights        3
Operating with expired license or without any license        3
Operating with multiple licenses        3
Prohibited or illegal turn        3
Speeding 1 through 10 mph over limit        3
Violation of restriction        3
Deprive any vehicle use of full traffic lane        2
Parking on highway in traffic lane, defective speedometer        2
License not in person's immediate possession        0
No registration plate light        0
Commercial motor vehicle convictions        Points
Operating while disqualified        6
Operating with alcohol concentration of 0.04 or more but less than 0.08 causing injury        6
Commercial speeding in excess (20 or more mph over limit)        6
Commercial speeding intermediate (15 through 19 mph over limit)        4
Possession of intoxicating beverage while operating or being on duty time with respect to a commercial motor vehicle        3
Unlawful commercial motor vehicle license or endorsement        3
Operating a commercial motor vehicle or being on duty time with respect to a commercial motor vehicle while having any measured alcohol concentration above 0.0 but less than 0.04 or within 4 hours of having consumed or having been under the influence of an intoxicating beverage, regardless of alcohol content        0
Operating with alcohol concentration of 0.04 or more but less than 0.08 and not causing injury        0
Motorcycle convictions        Points
Headlights not lit (daylight hours 0 points)        3
No cycle license        3
Defective or repaired handlebars        2
More than 2 riders (operator)        2
No eye protection (operator)        2
No protective headgear        0
A complete listing of driver license charges and the points assessed can be obtained by downloading BDS108 (17KB) Driver Licensing Abbreviation Codes with Charge & Points or Driver Licensing Conviction Charge Codes & Points with Statute Numbers BDS109 (56 KB)
Contact (608)266-2353 or rlis.dmv@dot.state.wi.us for more information. (Include your driver license number and date of birth.)
Chapter TRANS 101, (23 KB) Wisconsin Administrative Code provides complete details on the Wisconsin Point System.


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Q:   

How far may tires stick out past the fender wall?

 Two inches.


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Q:   

How high can I lift my vehicle?

 Four inches.


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Q:   

How long do violations stay on your record?

 See Wisconsin's point system and Driver license points - frequently asked questions


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Q:   

How long is my driver license revoked if I refuse the chemical test?

 One to three years. Mandatory one year for a first offense.


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Q:   

How many adults may sit in the front seat of a car or in the cab of a pickup?

 There's no limit, as long as the passengers don't obstruct the driver's view or impede the driver's ability to drive. All original seat belts must be used.


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Q:   

I am suspended or revoked. How can I get an occupational license and where?

 Apply at the DMV service center where your county resides. See Occupational license.
http://www.dot.wisconsin.gov/drivers/drivers/revoke/occlic.htm


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Q:   

I am visiting Wisconsin from another state. How many days do I have to get a Wisconsin license?

 Visitors and students from out of the country who are in Wisconsin for more than twelve months, and plan to operate a motor vehicle in Wisconsin, must obtain a Wisconsin license. They must meet the same requirements as a Wisconsin resident.
Visitors to Wisconsin (at least 16 years old) who do not plan to establish permanent residency, and members of the armed forces and their families living in Wisconsin but with permanent residence elsewhere, are not required to obtain a Wisconsin driver license. However, they must have a valid driver license from their home jurisdiction to operate a motor vehicle in Wisconsin. If Wisconsin residency is established, they must obtain a Wisconsin license within 30 days. Eligibility requirements are the same as those for a native Wisconsin resident.


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Q:   

I don't have a Wisconsin driver license. How and where can I get a Wisconsin I.D. card?

 When applying, it will be necessary to provide:
1.        Proof of name and date of birth through a certified birth certificate, passport, or naturalization papers.
2.        Acceptable proof of identity (usually a document with a signature or photo).
3.        Proof of Wisconsin residency.
The cost of an ID card is $9 for an original or renewal. A duplicate ID card costs $6. ID cards can be obtained at any DMV service center.
If you have questions:
·        E-mail: rlis.dmv@dot.state.wi.us
·        Call: (608)266-2353


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Q:   

I have a perfect driving record but the officer gave me a ticket anyway. Why?

 Decisions to cite are situational and circumstantial. The nature of the violation, weather conditions or other factors are considered before issuing a citation. An individual's driving record is typically not a factor.


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Q:   

I have a suspended Wisconsin driver license, but a valid Minnesota license. May I operate a vehicle in Wisconsin?

 No. You have lost your operating privileges. When your suspension period is over, you must reinstate your privileges by appearing at a DMV service center in Wisconsin before driving here again.


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Q:   

I have auxiliary lights mounted above the cab of my pickup. Are there restrictions?

 Yes. They cannot be used for highway use. They must be covered.


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Q:   

I just moved. How long do I have to get my address changed on my license?

 Ten days. See Change of address.


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Q:   

I lost my license. How do I get another one?

 To apply, you must visit a DMV service center. The fee for a duplicate license or permit is $4 and an identification (ID) card is $6.
A duplicate license, instruction permit or ID card is required when:
·        You change your name
·        Your license, permit or ID card is lost or stolen
·        You have truly changed gender, (requiring proof by court order or physician's report)
·        Your date of birth is incorrect (requiring proof of date of birth. If birth certificate, it must be a certified copy, not hospital certificate).
If your license, permit or ID card has or is about to expire you must renew it.
Commercial drivers are required to obtain a duplicate license if their address changes.
In all cases, proof of identity is required on a document that contains your full name, and a signature or photo. You must also know your social security number. It is recommended that you bring your social security card with you at the time of application.
If you are under 18 years of age, and applying for a duplicate license or instruction permit, this requires re-sponsorship, by a parent or legal guardian. If under 18 years of age and obtaining a duplicate instruction permit, proof of current enrollment in the behind-the-wheel portion of an approved driver education course is needed. Proof of entire course completion is also acceptable.
Acceptable documents for proof of:
·        Name and date of birth
·        Identity


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Q:   

I lost my ticket and forgot the appearance date. What should I do?

 Contact the Clerk of Courts in the county where the citation was issued.


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Q:   

I received a citation in a county other that the one I live in and never paid it. I found out there is a warrant for my arrest. How and where do I take care of it?

 Contact the Clerk of Court in the County where the citation was not paid.


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Q:   

I received a citation. Instead of going to court, I want to pay the fine. How do I go about paying it?

 Send the bond and pink copy of the citation to the Clerk of Courts of the county where the citation was issued. The address will be on the citation in the court information area.


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Q:   

I was stopped for what seemed like a long time. What was the officer doing in his car all that time?

 The officer is doing more than filling out a form. License and registration checks are made via radio or mobile data computer. Like the Internet, these inquiries are subject to delay due to volume or other technical circumstance. Officers need to make these checks and try their best to conclude the traffic stop as expeditiously as possible.


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Q:   

If I file a complaint against an officer will the ticket be dropped?

 No. While the Oneida Police Department will investigate complaints regarding the conduct of its employees, we believe that the merits of the citation should be assessed by the judiciary.


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Q:   

Is it illegal to have decals on my windshield?

 Stickers authorized by law (i.e., state park stickers or others issued by a government agency) are allowed four (4) inches up from the bottom of the windshield. SBB MVD 5.51


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Q:   

Is it illegal to operate in Wisconsin without your driver license on your person?

 Yes. RE: Wisconsin statute 343.18(1)


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Q:   

Is it legal to drive with your dome light on?

 Yes, however, it is more difficult to see at night with a light on in the vehicle. The light affects night vision. Inattentive driving may be involved, depending why the driver has the light on.


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Q:   

Is it legal to drive without shoes?

  
Q:   

Is it legal to operate a vehicle with a cast on?

  
Q:   

Is it legal to operate my vehicle with things hanging from my rear view mirror?

 No, it is an obstruction of view.


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Q:   

Is it unlawful to drive with headphones on?

 If there is reason to believe that this would interfere with safe operation of a vehicle, a person could be charged with inattentive driving.


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